Blood Flow and Continuous EEG Changes during Symptomatic Plateau Waves: Two Cases

Huynh, M. et al. “Blood Flow and Continuous EEG Changes during Symptomatic Plateau Waves: Two Cases”. Neurocritical Care Society Annual Meeting, September 2016, National Harbor, MD.

Use of Bedside Cerebral Blood Flow Monitor to Determine the Timing of Brain Death Evaluation

Mittal, M. “Use of Bedside Cerebral Blood Flow Monitor to Determine the Timing of Brain Death Evaluation”. Neurocritical Care Society Annual Meeting, September 2016, National Harbor, MD.

Timing of brain death evaluation could be crucial in maintaining organ perfusion for donation. This article presents a case illustrating the role of bedside blood flow monitoring in determining the timing of brain death evaluation, using Ornim’s c-FLOWTM Monitor.

Cerebral Autoregulation Real-Time Monitoring

Tsalach, A. et al. “Cerebral Autoregulation Real-Time Monitoring”. PLoS ONE 11 (8): e0161907, DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0161907.

This article describes the development of a new ultrasound-tagged near-infrared light monitor – Ornim’s c-FLOWTM, which tracks CBF trends. In parallel, it continuously measures blood pressure and correlates them to produce a real-time autoregulation index. Results suggest that using such a tool, autoregulation boundaries as well as its impairment or functioning can be identified and assessed.

Blood Pressure Deviations From Optimal Mean Arterial Pressure During Cardiac Surgery Measured With a Novel Monitor of Cerebral Blood Flow and Risk for Perioperative Delirium: A Pilot Study

Daijiro Hori, MD,. et al. “Blood Pressure Deviations From Optimal Mean Arterial Pressure During Cardiac Surgery Measured With a Novel Monitor of Cerebral Blood Flow and Risk for Perioperative Delirium: A Pilot Study”

Depth Discrimination in Acousto-Optic Cerebral Blood Flow Measurement Simulation

Tsalach, A. et al. “Depth Discrimination in Acousto-Optic Cerebral Blood Flow Measurement Simulation”, SPIE BIOS, International Society for Optics and Photonics, April 2016, Vol. 9708, p. 97083F1-9, DOI: 10.1117/12.2211587; poster.

Ornim’s depth sensitive blood flow measurement technique, based on the analysis of light modulated by ultrasound, is presented in this article and modeled in a computerized simulation. Distinct depth discrimination ability is demonstrated, showing that by using such method one can effectively nullify the contribution of extra-cerebral tissues to the obtained signals, and specifically extract cerebral flow data.

Perioperative Optimal Blood Pressure as Determined by Ultrasound Tagged Near Infrared Spectroscopy and Its Association with Postoperative Acute Kidney Injury in Cardiac Surgery Patients

Hori, D. et al. “Perioperative Optimal Blood Pressure as Determined by Ultrasound Tagged Near Infrared Spectroscopy and Its Association with Postoperative Acute Kidney Injury in Cardiac Surgery Patients” Interactive CardioVascular and Thoracic Surgery, January 12, 2016, 1-7, DOI: 10.1093/icvts/ivv371.

This article demonstrates a relationship between post-operative complications and failure to maintain optimal blood pressure during cardiopulmonary bypass surgery (CPB) and early ICU stay. It was suggested that Individualized blood pressure management based on cerebral autoregulation monitoring during the perioperative period may help improve patients’ outcomes.

Depth Selective Acousto-Optic Flow Measurement

Tsalach, A. et al. “Depth Selective Acousto-Optic Flow Measurement”. 2015 OSA, 1 Dec 2015, Vol. 6, No. 12, DOI: 10.1364/BOE.6.004871, Biomedical Optics Express p. 4871-4886.

This article demonstrates that spectral analysis of phase-coded light signals, tagged by specific ultrasound patterns, enables differentiation of flow patterns at different depths. In-vitro experiments which demonstrate good agreement with simulations’ results, provide a solid validation to Ornim’s depth discrimination ability and suggest that signal contamination originating from extra-cerebral tissue may be eliminated using spectral analysis of ultrasonically tagged light.

A New Monitor of Pressure Autoregulation: What Does It Add?

Brady, K. et al. “A New Monitor of Pressure Autoregulation: What Does It Add?” Anesthesia & Analgesia, November 2015; Vol. 122, No. 5, p. 1121-1123.

An Editorial reviewing Hori, D. et al. “Cerebral Autoregulation Monitoring with Ultrasound-Tagged Near-Infrared Spectroscopy in Cardiac Surgery Patients”. The transcranial Doppler is difficult to use continuously, especially in an environment of electrical noise such as the operating room. Compared with the transcranial Doppler, the UTLight method shown here is easy to apply and this is possibly the most significant contribution of the CFVx to assess autoregulation.

Cerebral Autoregulation Monitoring with Ultrasound-Tagged Near-Infrared Spectroscopy in Cardiac Surgery Patients

Hori, D. et al. “Cerebral Autoregulation Monitoring with Ultrasound-Tagged Near-Infrared Spectroscopy in Cardiac Surgery Patients”. Anesthesia & Analgesia, 2015 Nov; 121(5):1187-93.

This article demonstrates a statistically significant correlation and agreement between cerebral blood flow (CBF) autoregulation monitored by Ornim’s CerOx, compared with TCD-based Mx.

A Preliminary Evaluation of the Cost-Effectiveness of A Noninvasive Continuous Cerebral Perfusion Monitor

Hopkins, T. “A Preliminary Evaluation of the Cost-Effectiveness of A Noninvasive Continuous Cerebral Perfusion Monitor”. Accepted by the Society of Neuroscience in Anesthesiology and Critical Care, to be presented at the SNACC Conference, October 2015, San Diego, CA.

This articles describes an innovative method of evaluating the cost-effectiveness of the fixed and variable investment necessary to support adding a non-invasive cerebral perfusion monitoring device to a hospital.

Real-Time Autoregulation Monitor – Preclinical Study

Tsalach, A. et al. “Real-Time Autoregulation Monitor – Preclinical Study”. Neurocritical Care Society Annual Meeting, October 2015, Scottsdale, AZ.

The results of this study suggest that Ornim’s c-FLOWTM monitor may be a helpful tool in outlining autoregulation, its reactivity and boundaries. This indicates that Ornim’s c-FLOWTM monitor may become a handy tool in clinical practice for individualized management of blood pressure where cerebral autoregulation may be compromised.

Intraoperative Cerebral Autoregulation Assessment Using Ultrasound-Tagged Near Infrared-Based Cerebral Blood Flow in Comparison to Transcranial Doppler Cerebral Flow Velocity: A Pilot Study

Murkin, J.M. et al. “Intraoperative Cerebral Autoregulation Assessment Using Ultrasound-Tagged Near Infrared-Based Cerebral Blood Flow in Comparison to Transcranial Doppler Cerebral Flow Velocity: A Pilot Study”, Journal of Cardiothoracic and Vascular Anesthesia, Vol 29, No. 5 (October), 2015; pp. 1187-1193.

This article shows that monitoring and individualization of cerebral perfusion parameters is a requisite for maintenance of optimal perioperative cerebral perfusion, and that real-time detection of cerebral autoregulation demonstrates a significant role in patient outcomes in various settings. Also demonstrated in this article is an excellent concordance of CFIx with TCD-derived Mx for detection of cerebral autoregulation and LLA (lower limit of cerebral autoregulation).

Acousto-Optic Cerebral Blood Flow Monitoring During Induction of Anesthesia in Humans

Schwarz, M. et al. “Acousto-Optic Cerebral Blood Flow Monitoring During Induction of Anesthesia in Humans”. Presented at the SNACC Conference, October 2015, San Diego, CA.

The findings of this study support the notion that accousto-optic monitoring yields valid real-time measures of changes in CBF in humans. This study shows differences in CBF during certain periods of anesthesia, when brain perfusion can be compromised.

Acousto-Optic Cerebral Blood Flow Monitoring During Induction of Anesthesia in Humans

Schwarz, M. et al. “Acousto-Optic Cerebral Blood Flow Monitoring During Induction of Anesthesia in Humans”. Published on Neurocritical Care Society online Journal, DOI 10.1007/s12028-015-0201-2, September 23, 2015.

The findings of this study support the notion that accousto-optic monitoring yields valid real-time measures of changes in CBF in humans. This study shows differences in CBF during certain periods of anesthesia, when brain perfusion can be compromised.

Validation of the Ornim UTLight Flowmetry Device in the Measurement of Cerebral Blood Flow in Acute Stroke Patients Undergoing Emergent Endovascular Therapy

Devlin, T. et al. “Validation of the Ornim UTLight Flowmetry Device in the Measurement of Cerebral Blood Flow in Acute Stroke Patients Undergoing Emergent Endovascular Therapy”. Annual Meeting of the AANS/CNS Cerebrovascular Section Programming in Conjunction with SNIS, February 2015, Nashville, TN (Poster).

The findings of this study suggest that Ornim’s novel technology, UTLightTM, can quickly and accurately assess cerebral blood flow non-invasively in stroke patients receiving salvage therapy (EVT, ra-TPA). As such, it may be used to optimize cerebral blood flow in critical ill patients in general, and assess reperfusion in stroke patients in particular.

Optoacoustic Cerebral Blood Flow Monitoring During Induction of Anesthesia in Humans

Kofke, A. et al. “Optoacoustic Cerebral Blood Flow Monitoring During Induction of Anesthesia in Humans”. Submitted to the Journal of Neurocritical Care, 2014.

The findings of this study support the notion that accousto-optic monitoring yields valid real-time measures of changes in CBF in humans.

Optoacoustic Cerebral Blood Flow (CBF) Monitoring During Induction of Anesthesia in Humans

Kofke, A. et al. “Optoacoustic Cerebral Blood Flow Monitoring During Induction of Anesthesia in Humans”. Presented at the Neurocritical Care Society Annual Meeting, October 2014, Seattle, WA.

The findings of this study support the notion that accousto-optic monitoring yields valid real-time measures of changes in CBF in humans.

Ultrasound Modulated Light Blood Flow Measurement Using Intensity Autocorrelation Function: a Monte-Carlo Simulation

Tsalach, A. et al. “Ultrasound Modulated Light Blood Flow Measurement Using Intensity Autocorrelation Function: a Monte-Carlo Simulation”. International Society for Optics and Photonics (SPIE BiOS), April 2014, San Francisco, CA.

This article presents and validates a novel comprehensive simulation, uniting the influence of Brownian motion, blood flow and US on light transmitted through a tissue. This simulation may provide valuable data for various optical-based applications and may assist in quantification of non-invasive measurements of blood flow in methods that combine light and ultrasound.

Assessment of the CerOx Cerebral Oxygenation Monitor in Severe Traumatic Brain Injury Patients

Rosenthal, G. et al. “Assessment of a Noninvasive Cerebral Oxygenation Monitor in Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury”. Journal of Neurosurgery 120:901-907, April 2014.

This study demonstrates that the correlation between Ornim’s CerOx measurements and the jugular bulb venous measurements of oxygen saturation indicate that the CerOx may be able to provide an estimation of cerebral oxygenation status in a non-invasive manner.

A Novel Cerebral Flow Monitor for Detecting Autoregulation – Animal Study

Kamar, M. et al. “A Novel Cerebral Flow Monitor for Detecting Autoregulation – Animal Study”. Presented at the 18th Meeting of the European Society of Neurosonology and Cerebral Hemodynamics (ESNCH), May 2013, Porto, Portugal (Abstract).

This articles suggests that Ornim’s CerOx flow monitoring device, together with a continuous blood pressure input, may be a helpful tool in outlining autoregulation, its reactivity and boundaries. It is also suggested that the CerOx may come as a handy tool for individualized management of blood pressure in clinical settings, where cerebral autoregulation and cerebral perfusion may be compromised.

Detecting Cerebral Autoregulation Thresholds Using a Non-Invasive Cerebral Flow Monitor

Kamar, M. et al. “Detecting Cerebral Autoregulation Thresholds Using a Non-Invasive Cerebral Flow Monitor”. 18th Meeting of the European Society of Neurosonology and Cerebral Hemodynamics (ESNCH), May 2013, Porto, Portugal (Poster).

This article suggests that cerebral blood flow (CBF) and low limit cerebral autoregulation (LLA) can be detected continuously and non-invasively using UT-NIRS technology.

A New Technology for Detecting Cerebral Blood Flow: A Comparative Study of Ultrasound Tagged NIRS and 133Xe-SPECT

Schytz, H.W. et. al. “A New Technology for Detecting Cerebral Blood Flow: A Comparative Study of Ultrasound Tagged NIRS and 133Xe-SPECT”. Presented at the 18th Meeting of the European Society of Neurosonology and Cerebral Hemodynamics (ESNCH), May 2013, Porto, Portugal.

This study shows the sensitivity of UT-NIRS to detect changes in CBF in response to acetazolamide, a drug known for its effect on intracerebral blood flow. In this study, UT-NIRS detected an increase in CFI following an acetazolamide bolus. CFI changes correlated with CBF measure with 133Xe-SPECT at 15 min after acetazolamide. ROC curve analysis for detecting an increase in CFI following acetazolamide demonstrated a very good discrimination power.

A Novel Cerebral Flow Monitor for Detecting Autoregulation – Animal Study

Kamar, M. et al. “A Novel Cerebral Flow Monitor for Detecting Autoregulation – Animal Study”. Cerebrovasc Dis 2013;35, April 2013, (suppl 2):P21.

This articles suggests that Ornim’s CerOx flow monitoring device, together with a continuous blood pressure input, may be a helpful tool in outlining autoregulation, its reactivity and boundaries. It is also suggested that the CerOx may come as a handy tool for individualized management of blood pressure in clinical settings, where cerebral autoregulation and cerebral perfusion may be compromised.

A Tissue Mimicking Phantom Model for Applications Combining Light and Ultrasound

Ron, A. et al. “A Tissue Mimicking Phantom Model for Applications Combining Light and Ultrasound”. Photonics West, February 2013, San Francisco, CA (BIOS, Oral).

This article demonstrates a stable and reproducible liquid tissue mimicking phantom, optimized for applications involving both ultrasound and light waves. The phantom was shown to be stable during the measurement. 

Detecting Neurological Deficit and Vasospasm in the Post Subarachnoid Period – Comparison of Ultrasound Tagged NIRS Oximetry and Transcranial Doppler

Sarma, A.K. et al. “Detecting Neurological Deficit and Vasospasm in the Post Subarachnoid Period – Comparison of Ultrasound Tagged NIRS Oximetry and Transcranial Doppler”. Neurocritical Care Society Annual Meeting, October 2012, Denver, CO (Poster).

A Comparative Study of Ultrasound Tagged NIRS And 133Xe SPECT

Schytz, H.W. et al. “A New Technology for Detecting Cerebral Blood Flow: A Comparative Study of Ultrasound Tagged NIRS and 133Xe-SPECT”. Presented at The Neurocritical Care Society Annual Meeting, October 2012, Denver, CO.

This study shows the sensitivity of UT-NIRS to detect changes in CBF in response to acetazolamide, a drug known for its effect on intracerebral blood flow. In this study, UT-NIRS detected an increase in CFI following an acetazolamide bolus. CFI changes correlated with CBF measure with 133Xe-SPECT at 15 min after acetazolamide. ROC curve analysis for detecting an increase in CFI following acetazolamide demonstrated a very good discrimination power.

 

A New Technology for Detecting Cerebral Blood Flow: A Comparative Study of Ultrasound Tagged NIRS and 133Xe-SPECT

Schytz, H.W. et al. “A New Technology for Detecting Cerebral Blood Flow: A Comparative Study of Ultrasound Tagged NIRS and 133Xe-SPECT”. Neurocritical Care, May 2012; 17(1):139-45.

This study shows the sensitivity of UT-NIRS to detect changes in CBF in response to acetazolamide, a drug known for its effect on intracerebral blood flow. In this study, UT-NIRS detected an increase in CFI following an acetazolamide bolus. CFI changes correlated with CBF measure with 133Xe-SPECT at 15 min after acetazolamide. ROC curve analysis for detecting an increase in CFI following acetazolamide demonstrated a very good discrimination power.

 

Non-Invasive Blood Flow Measurements Using Ultrasound Modulated Diffused Light

Racheli, N. et al. “Non-Invasive Blood Flow Measurements Using Ultrasound Modulated Diffused Light”. Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2012, edited by Alexander A. Oraevsky, Lihong V. Wang, of SPIE Vol. 8223, February 2012, paper 82232A.

This article presents a novel, non-invasive method for measuring blood flow based on the accousto-optic effect, using ultrasound modulated diffused light. Its benefits are deep issue sampling, continuous real-time measurement, simplicity of apparatus and ease of operation. This study demonstrates a high linear correlation between the calculated flow index (CFI), defined by the UTL curves, and the actual flow rated in an artificial flow phantom.

Measuring Tissue Blood Flow using Ultrasound Modulated Diffused Light

Ron, A. et al. “Measuring Tissue Blood Flow using Ultrasound Modulated Diffused Light”. Photons Plus Ultrasound: Imaging and Sensing 2012, edited by Alexander A. Oraevsky, Lihong V. Wang, of SPIE Vol. 8223, February 2012, paper 82232J.

This article demonstrates that ultrasound-tagged light flowmetry can be used to detect changes in tissue blood flow on a swine model. This ability offers a clinical potential in monitoring tissue perfusion in various flow states.

Measuring Tissue Blood Flow Using Ultrasound Modulated Diffused Light

Ron, A. et al. “Measuring Tissue Blood Flow using Ultrasound Modulated Diffused Light”. Presented at Photonics West, January 2012, San Francisco, CA (BIOS, Poster).

This article demonstrates that ultrasound-tagged light flowmetry can be used to detect changes in tissue blood flow on a swine model. This ability offers a clinical potential in monitoring tissue perfusion in various flow states.

Non-Invasive Blood Flow Measurements Using Ultrasound Modulated Diffused Light

Racheli, N. et al. “Non-Invasive Blood Flow Measurements Using Ultrasound Modulated Diffused Light”. Photonics West, January 2012, San Francisco, CA (Oral).

This presentation describes a novel method for continuously and non-invasively measuring flow in deep tissue based on ultrasound modulated diffused light. Data demonstrate a linear correlation of CFI to flow in channels deeper than 1cm in a synthetic phantom, in addition to a very good in-vivo correlation to laser Doppler readings.

Noninvasive Measurement of Cerebral Blood Flow in Piglets During Resuscitation Induced Physiologic Challenges

Nini, A. et al. “Noninvasive Measurement of Cerebral Blood Flow in Piglets During Resuscitation Induced Physiologic Challenges”. American Heart Association (AHA), Scientific Sessions on Resuscitation, Nov 2010, Chicago, IL (Poster; 2010; 122:A162).

In clinical scenarios such as resuscitation, where cerebral perfusion may be compromised, continuous non-invasive monitoring of CBF is feasible during treatment, and may provide crucial information to caregivers, alter treatment and change neurological outcome.

A New Technology for Detecting Cerebral Blood Flow: A Comparative Study of Ultrasound Tagged NIRS and 133Xe-SPECT

Schytz, H.W. et al. “A New Technology for Detecting Cerebral Blood Flow: A Comparative Study of Ultrasound Tagged NIRS and 133Xe-SPECT” Neurocritical Care. 2012 Aug;17(1):139-45

Brain Tissue Perfusion

Graffagnino, C. “Brain Tissue Perfusion”. Neurocritical Care Society Annual Meeting, September 2010, San Francisco, CA (Invited oral presentation).

What’s There and What Do I Need in the Neuro ICU

Kofke, A. “What’s There and What Do I Need in the Neuro ICU” – UPENN. Clinical Integration of Tomographic Physiological Imaging and Multimodal Monitoring – Present and Future, August 2010, Santa Fe, NM (Oral).

Preliminary Assessment of the CerOx 3110 Non-invasive Monitor in Detecting Changes in Cerebral Blood Flow in Severe TBI Patients

Rosenthal, G. et al. “Preliminary Assessment of the CerOx 3110 Non-invasive Monitor in Detecting Changes in Cerebral Blood Flow in Severe TBI Patients”. Presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Association of Neurological Surgeons (AANS), May 2010, Philadelphia, PA.

Preliminary Assessment of the CerOx 3110 Non-Invasive Monitor in Severe TBI Patients

Rosenthal, G. “Preliminary Assessment of the CerOx 3110 Non-invasive Monitor in Detecting Changes in Cerebral Blood Flow in Severe TBI Patients”. Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Israeli Society of Neurosurgery, March 2010, Ma’ale Hachmisha, Israel.

* Research was awarded Third Place at the 2010 AANS Annual Meeting in the category of Trauma/Critical Care

Initial Experience and Feasibility of a Non-Invasive Brain Oxygen Monitor in Neurocritical Care

Singh, V. et al. “Initial Experience and Feasibility of a Non-Invasive Brain Oxygen Monitor in Neurocritical Care“.(Poster). Neurocrit Care (2009) 11-S1-S224.

Continuous monitoring with CerOX3110 is safe and feasible in neurocritical care setting. It has the potential of providing information about cerebral metabolism needed for close monitoring and management of patients with severe brain injury.

Cerebral Oximetry via Near Infrared Spectroscopy Mirrors De-Saturations of Brain Tissue Partial Pressure of Oxygen: a Case Study

Wible, E. et al. “Cerebral Oximetry via Near Infrared Spectroscopy Mirrors De-Saturations of Brain Tissue Partial Pressure of Oxygen: a Case Study”. Neurocrit Care (2009) 11-S1-S224.

CerOx monitoring may provide an enhanced understanding of oxygen delivery and utilization during periods of ongoing cerebral ischemia.

Cerebral Oximetry via Near Infrared Spectroscopy Mirrors Desaturations of Brain Tissue Partial Pressure Of Oxygen: A Case Study

Wible, E. et al. “Cerebral Oximetry via Near Infrared Spectroscopy Mirrors De-Saturations of Brain Tissue Partial Pressure of Oxygen: a Case Study”. Presented at the Neurocritical Care Society Annual Meeting, November 2009, New Orleans, LA (Poster).

CerOx monitoring may provide an enhanced understanding of oxygen delivery and utilization during periods of ongoing cerebral ischemia.

Gress, D. “Non-Invasive Brain Oximetry”. The 51st Conference of The Israeli Society of Critical Care Medicine, July 2009, Hertzeliya, Israel (Invited oral presentation)

Gress, D. “Non-Invasive Brain Oximetry”. The 51st Conference of The Israeli Society of Critical Care Medicine, July 2009, Hertzeliya, Israel (Invited oral presentation).

In this presentation, the advantages of cerebral oximetry in neuroctirical care setting are demonstrated.

The Pacifica Oximeter: a Novel Spectrophotometric Device for Monitoring Tissue Oxygen saturation

Nini, A. et al. “The Pacifica Oximeter: a Novel Spectrophotometric Device for Monitoring Tissue Oxygen saturation”. Neurocritical Care Society Annual Meeting, October 2007, Las Vegas, NV (Poster).